Congress Nears $70 Billion Tax Deal: Child Tax Credit and Business Incentives

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Unveiling a historic $70 billion bipartisan and bicameral agreement is imminent in the United States Congress. The House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee reached an agreement to prolong tax cuts for companies and increase the child tax credit until 2025. As a rare example of significant bipartisan legislation in a divided Congress, this deal strikes a balance between the Democratic priority of expanding the child tax credit and the Republican goal of providing incentives to businesses.

Why This Agreement Is Crucial

Both parties involved are highly invested in the potential deal. This presents a chance for Democrats to reinstate the expanded child tax credit, which was instrumental in significantly lowering childhood poverty rates but was set to expire in 2022. Democrats intend to maintain their fight against child poverty and to assist low-income and multi-child families by increasing the child tax credit. After struggling to pass new legislation since retaking the House, Republicans see this deal as a chance to appease their traditional business friends in an election year.

A Optimistic View from Representative Jason Smith

The head of the Ways and Means Committee, which is responsible for drafting tax legislation, Representative Jason Smith, was upbeat about the possible agreement, saying, “It’s looking good.” This outlook is consistent with the general optimism felt by all parties engaged in the negotiations. The deal must be finalized by January 29, according to Senate Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden, who is adamant about getting it done before the filing season.

The Suggested Measures

The details of the new deal are still being ironed out, but it will aim to help low-income families and families with more than one child by doing things like expanding the child tax credit and giving companies new tax breaks. Here are the main points of the agreement:

The Child Tax Credit: A Huge Improvement

The goal of the agreement is to level the playing field for families with low incomes and middle-class and higher-class incomes when it comes to the refundable child tax credit. The plan calls for gradually removing the $1,600 limit on refundable credits and increasing refundable child tax credits. Furthermore, taxpayers would be able to utilize income from prior years if doing so allows them to access larger benefits. The present negotiations do not include the 2021 program’s monthly child cash payments to families.

Reductions in Business Taxes

Tax cuts for companies are also part of the deal, bringing back some of the policies that were part of the Trump tax cuts in 2017 but have since expired. Extending bonus depreciation, restoring the pre-2017 interest deduction, expanding small-business expensing, and allowing full expensing for domestic research and development are all parts of these provisions. The Republican Party is trying to make good on its promise to back businesses by providing these incentives, particularly in this election year.

The Obstacles and Advancements

The talks have started, but there are still a lot of obstacles to overcome. Republicans are concentrating on tax matters pertaining to the cleanup of natural disasters, while Democrats are urging for housing provisions. Delegates from both houses of Congress are optimistic that they can overcome these obstacles and reach a compromise. The ranking member of the Senate’s financial committee, Senator Mike Crapo, has voiced his desire for a positive conclusion and stressed the significance of reaching a resolution.

Taken from the viewpoint of Representative Katie Porter

As a single mother serving in Congress, Katie Porter is an advocate for tax policies that reduce financial burdens on families. But she warns against giving companies too much leeway and instead calls for measures that help working families. Her views are reflective of the Democratic Party’s continuing internal conflict over how to best serve working families while simultaneously bolstering company interests.

The Priorities of Senator Sherrod Brown

The involvement of Senator Sherrod Brown in these discussions highlights his commitment to supporting families as they raise children. He thinks middle-class Americans will win big with this possible deal. Brown hopes to help low-income families in a concrete way by pushing for the child tax credit.

See first source: NBC

FAQ

Q1: What is the $70 billion bipartisan agreement in the United States Congress about?

A1: The agreement reached by the House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee aims to prolong tax cuts for companies and increase the child tax credit until 2025. It represents a significant bipartisan effort in Congress, balancing the Democratic goal of expanding the child tax credit and the Republican goal of providing incentives to businesses.

Q2: Why is this agreement crucial for both parties involved?

A2: For Democrats, this agreement presents an opportunity to reinstate the expanded child tax credit, which helped reduce childhood poverty rates but was set to expire in 2022. They aim to fight child poverty and assist low-income and multi-child families. For Republicans, this deal is a chance to satisfy their traditional business allies in an election year.

Q3: What is the outlook for this agreement according to Representative Jason Smith?

A3: Representative Jason Smith, head of the Ways and Means Committee, expressed optimism about the potential agreement, stating that “It’s looking good.” This positive outlook is shared by all parties involved in the negotiations, and they aim to finalize the deal by January 29, before the filing season.

Q4: What are the main measures included in the proposed agreement?

A4: The agreement aims to help low-income and multi-child families by expanding the child tax credit and providing new tax breaks for companies. Specifically, it seeks to gradually remove the $1,600 limit on refundable child tax credits, increase refundable child tax credits, and allow taxpayers to use income from prior years to access larger benefits. It also includes tax cuts for businesses, reviving policies from the 2017 Trump tax cuts that had expired.

Q5: What obstacles and challenges do the negotiations face?

A5: The negotiations face obstacles related to different priorities. Republicans are focusing on tax matters related to the cleanup of natural disasters, while Democrats are advocating for housing provisions. However, delegates from both houses of Congress remain optimistic about overcoming these obstacles and reaching a compromise.

Q6: What are the viewpoints of Representative Katie Porter and Senator Sherrod Brown on this deal?

A6: Representative Katie Porter advocates for tax policies that reduce financial burdens on families and emphasizes the need to avoid giving companies excessive leeway. She calls for measures that primarily benefit working families. Senator Sherrod Brown supports the deal and believes it will benefit middle-class Americans, particularly through the child tax credit, as it helps low-income families.

Featured Image Credit: Photo by Elijah Mears; Unsplash – Thank you!

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